Wednesday, October 20, 2010

White Country, Indiana

The Cosgray family has had it, by God. Unlike the rest of of us, they raised their children right (and I do mean right), teaching them "values." (My kids apparently missed out on that.)  Moreover, the Cosgrays, residents of White Country -- excuse me, County -- Indiana, also taught Alex, Tyler, Rachel, and little Nichole that "you don't rely on the government." It's said with a combination of smugness and reproach, as if they know that there are irresponsible parents out there who knowingly expose their innocent children to the dastardly clutches of an intrusive government.

Laura Cosgray organizes for the Tea Party, dreams of a senatorial candidate to the right of Richard Lugar (the apostate with an American Conservative Union lifetime score of 77), bakes snickerdoodles, and waits for Sam Cosgray to come home from his job with Caterpillar. The Cosgrays then -- say what? Did someone say that Sam works for Caterpillar? The company that has raked in 1.7 billion in defense contracts since 2000? The company that would have laid off even more than the 20,000 workers it did lay off if not for the stimulus? The company that has a collaborative arrangement with Mitsubishi, which has no doubt benefited greatly from official Japanese industrial policy?

Sounds to me like Sammy couldn't get out of bed without the government. In fact, he needs two governments just to brush his teeth in the morning. Or maybe it's one to brush his teeth and the other to wipe his snickerdoodle. The Cosgrays, it turns out, are pious frauds.

Judging from the admiring portrait on msnbc.com, White Country -- County -- is lousy with frauds, pious and otherwise. Seattle may be on the sinful left coast, a too-close-for-comfort 800 miles from Sodom Francisco, but better that than the fate of Indianapolis: It's 74 miles from White Country...

The Guitar Song, Jamey Johnson. One of the more ambitious country albums of this or any other year. Johnson puts his considerable honky tonk chops on display immediately (Chris Whitley's "Lonely at the Top"), then begins a trek through the folk and blues roots of country music, with occasional detours into introspective guitar workouts and intriguing reworkings of old favorites like "Mental Revenge" and "Sunday Morning Coming Down." Throughout, Johnson adopts a convincing proletarian persona; the result is an album that is both authentic and original. Highly recommended.

This one goes out to the Cosgrays:


Waylon has something to say about the Cosgrays, too:

6 comments:

Roy said...

Yeah, Tea Party types never have been noted for a sense of perspective. "Get te gummint out of my life but don't touch my Medicare!" Right!

Ginny said...

The only thing harder than sprinkling ethics over Goldman Sachs et al. is sprinkling critical thinking over the Tea Partiers.

Loved that Jamey Johnson.

TaraDharma said...

The hallmark of the tea party is the absence of critical thinking. Why, critical thinking would mess up all their strident, uniformed rhetoric. They would have to live with contradictions and ambiguity. Naw, things are so much easier in black and white.

K. said...

Something else hit me. Caterpillar likely offers health care benefits to their employees. Since those are tax exempt, the government subsidizes them -- yet another example of the Cosgray's dependency on the federal teat.

paula said...

Gee, I hope the Cosgray's teach their children to never drive on (government-built)interstates, mail or receive letters through the socialist USPS, watch TV (which is minimally overseen by the wicked FCC), fly (because that would mean they'd fall under the supervision of those creep air-traffic controllers, all US gummint employees), and never take prescription drugs approved by the FDA. In fact, they might want to limit breathing air, because its quality is monitored by those awful tree-huggers in the EPA. Just saying...

K. said...

No doubt the kids' TV viewing is restricted to the Chrisitian Broadcasting Network.

How about a story on the values the millions of liberal parents pass on to the their kids? I suppose that judging not and doing unto others doesn't make good press.